A recipe for you

 

RECIPE

Colcannon (with a twist)

IMG_0834
Most Irish people know colcannon well enough to be almost fed up with it. Generally on Mondays it was served up with the remnants of yesterdays cabbage or any other greens that were left over(and some extra added if needed). If a joint of ham or bacon had been served, that too was stripped and added, if there was ever anything left. Sometimes an onion, or a scallion or two would be thrown in, and if you pleaded long enough, you might get a few swipes of grated cheese added to the top. In many ways, it’s similar to bubble in England in principle, although shaping the remnants into patties for frying probably distinguishes them from each other.

So traditionally, colcannon was a mixture of creamy mashed ‘floury potatoes’ cabbage or spring greens with, with milk and butter added, and cream if you had it, and maybe a few bits of bacon. In the south-east of Ireland it’s mainly served with a rack of boiled ribs, and those boiled with cabbage. Open the kitchen windows if you’re doing that, as the house smells like a thousand farts otherwise.

Having grown up with it, I’ve made multiple variations, and still call them colcannon, and I don’t care if anybody tells me it’s not…it’s food, and I’ll call it what I want! Here’s my favourite. (Serves 4-6 depending on what kind of a spud monster you are)

Ingredients

16-20 medium sized potatoes, with skins scrubbed, sliced in half
3 leeks, topped, tailed, and sliced
1 small savoy cabbage, finely diced or equivalent in finely diced kale leaf (remove the stalky bits)
1 onion, finely chopped
2 Quorn gammon steaks, fried and torn into small pieces
1 lump of butter, for the mashing
2 heaped tablespoons of double cream, for the mashing
2 heaped tablespoons of mascarpone cheese, for the mashing
2 unwaxed lemons…grated rind only, with a tiny twist of juice
1 teaspoon of yellow mustard seeds
salt & pepper

Cooking and Serving

Boil potatoes until soft (20 mins or so)
Saute the onions for five minutes before adding the mustard seed and leeks. Keep frying until the edges of the leeks begin browning.
Steam the finely diced cabbage/kale for six minutes, until turning soft
Fry the gammon steaks for six to seven minutes and tear into small pieces
Add butter, cream and mascarpone cheese to the potatoes and mash well adding the lemon at the end and giving it a last whip in.
Once mashed and creamed up, add everything else and fold it all in together
Take 4-6 warm ramekins and fill each as desired

If you’re feeling peaky, add a bit of cheddar to the top and let it sit in a hot oven for five minutes…ignore what anybody tells you! It’s still colcannon. Goes well with most things, like pies, steaks, chops, ribs…the lemon even helps if there’s a freshwater fish on the go, but leave the cheese if there is. It’s gentle on the stomach too and was probably popular as a kind of settler after a weekend.
Colcannon (with a twist)
Most Irish people know colcannon well enough to be almost fed up with it. Generally on Mondays it was served up with the remnants of yesterdays cabbage or any other greens that were left over(and some extra added if needed). If a joint of ham or bacon had been served, that too was stripped and added, if there was ever anything left. Sometimes an onion, or a scallion or two would be thrown in, and if you pleaded long enough, you might get a few swipes of grated cheese added to the top. In many ways, it’s similar to bubble in England in principle, although shaping the remnants into patties for frying probably distinguishes them from each other.

So traditionally, colcannon was a mixture of creamy mashed ‘floury potatoes’ cabbage or spring greens with, with milk and butter added, and cream if you had it, and maybe a few bits of bacon. In the south-east of Ireland it’s mainly served with a rack of boiled ribs, and those boiled with cabbage. Open the kitchen windows if you’re doing that, as the house smells like a thousand farts otherwise.

Having grown up with it, I’ve made multiple variations, and still call them colcannon, and I don’t care if anybody tells me it’s not…it’s food, and I’ll call it what I want! Here’s my favourite. (Serves 4-6 depending on what kind of a spud monster you are)

Ingredients

16-20 medium sized potatoes, with skins scrubbed, sliced in half
3 leeks, topped, tailed, and sliced
1 small savoy cabbage, finely diced or equivalent in finely diced kale leaf (remove the stalky bits)
1 onion, finely chopped
2 Quorn gammon steaks, fried and torn into small pieces
1 lump of butter, for the mashing
2 heaped tablespoons of double cream, for the mashing
2 heaped tablespoons of mascarpone cheese, for the mashing
2 unwaxed lemons…grated rind only, with a tiny twist of juice
1 teaspoon of yellow mustard seeds
salt & pepper

Cooking and Serving

Boil potatoes until soft (20 mins or so)
Saute the onions for five minutes before adding the mustard seed and leeks. Keep frying until the edges of the leeks begin browning.
Steam the finely diced cabbage/kale for six minutes, until turning soft
Fry the gammon steaks for six to seven minutes and tear into small pieces
Add butter, cream and mascarpone cheese to the potatoes and mash well adding the lemon at the end and giving it a last whip in.
Once mashed and creamed up, add everything else and fold it all in together
Take 4-6 warm ramekins and fill each as desired

If you’re feeling peaky, add a bit of cheddar to the top and let it sit in a hot oven for five minutes…ignore what anybody tells you! It’s still colcannon. Goes well with most things, like pies, steaks, chops, ribs…the lemon even helps if there’s a freshwater fish on the go, but leave the cheese if there is. It’s gentle on the stomach too and was probably popular as a kind of settler after a weekend.

Advertisements